Swede Spaghetti, Miso Emulsion, Parmesan and Brioche crumbs

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (May 2018) and taken from Planted: Stunning seasonal vegan dishes by Chantelle Nicholson.

Swede spaghetti, instead of pasta, adds a sweet, slight crunchiness to this dish.

Serves : 4

Swede spaghettiIngredients :
4 slices brioche
2 tblsp white miso paste
4 tblsp extra virgin olive oil
100ml light vegetable stock
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large swede, peeled and spiralised
1/2 bunch of flat-leaf parsley, leaves finely chopped
50g non-dairy Parmesan-style ‘cheese’

Step One : Preheat the oven to 150oC / 300oF / Gas mark 2. Tear the brioche into small pieces and spread out on a roasting tray. Bake for around 20 minutes until golden.

Step Two : Put the miso paste and oil into a large saucepan over a medium heat. When heated, whisk together and add the vegetable stock. Season well with black pepper.

Step Three : Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. Plunge the swede into it and cook for 2-3 minutes until just al dente. Strain the swede, then add to the saucepan containing the miso emulsion. Stir well, then add the parsley.

Step Four : Share between 4 bowls, grate the ‘cheese’ on the top of each and crumble the brioche over, to serve.

Beautiful Raw Root Salad

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (September 2016).

‘When we look at beautiful foods, our digestive system starts to wake up, so we might argue that we start eating with our eyes – and this salad is definitely a feast for the eyes.’ Raw chef, Solla Eiriksdottir.

Raw root salad.jpgServes : 4-6

Ingredients :
300g red cabbage, cut into thin strips
2 carrots, cut into thin round slices
1 courgette, cut into thin, round slices
1 yellow beetroot, cut into thin, round slices
1 striped or red beetroot, cut into thin, round slices
5 radishes, cut into slices
1 pear, cut in half, cored and cut into thin slices
Seeds of 1 pomegranate
50g pistachios
10 dried Incan golden berries
4 tblsp green herbs, such as coriander, mint, basil and parsley finely chopped

For the dressing :
50ml walnut or olive oil
3 tblsp lemon juice
3 tblsp mandarin or orange juice
1 tblsp rice vinegar (or your favourite vinegar)
1 tsp ras el hanout spice
1 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp sea salt

Step One : To make the dressing, put all the ingredients into a clean jar, put on the lid and shake to mix. Set aside.

Step Two : Put the prepared vegetables into a bowl, and pour over the dressing, then, using your fingers, massage the dressing into the vegetables.

Step Three : Let the vegetables marinate for 15-20 minutes. When ready to eat, put the vegetables into a serving bowl, add the remaining ingredients, toss together, and enjoy.

Comforting Tomato Soup

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (December 2015) and taken from At Home with Umami by Laura Santtini.

soupsServes : 4-6

Ingredients :
190g butter
1 medium white onion, diced
2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes
1.5 litres tomato juice
2 tblsp sugar, to taste
2 chicken stock cubes
freshly ground black pepper
1 handful flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1 handful fresh basil, chopped

Step One : Melt the butter in a large pot over a medium heat.  Once melted, add the onion and cook until translucent.  Add the chopped tomatoes, tomato juice and sugar.  Stir to combine.

Step Two : Add the chicken stock cubes and some freshly ground black pepper and stir well.  Allow the soup to boil for 20-30 minutes.

Step Three : Turn off the heat and using a stick blender, blend the soup until it is completely smooth.  Stir in fresh herbs and serve.

Broccoli Soup

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (June 2016) and taken from “Good & Simple” by Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley.

Brocolli soupMakes about 4 litres, 9 servings

Ingredients :
4 large onions, roughly chopped
2 tblsp ghee or coconut oil
4 heads of broccoli (about 350g each)
8 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1 bunch of celery (about 6 sticks), roughly chopped
2 litres bone broth or water
Juice of 1 1/2 lemons
Sea salt and black pepper

Step One : In a 4-litre saucepan, fry the onions in ghee or coconut oil over a medium heat for 8 mins until soft. Cut the broccoli into florets and roughly chop the stalks (after removing the tough outer layer).  Add the garlic, celery and broccoli stalks to the pan and cook for 2 mins, then add the broth or water, cover the pan with a lid and bring to a medium simmer.

Step Two : Add the broccoli florets and a big pinch of salt and pepper, then allow to simmer until the broccoli is just tender – about 5 mins.

(The broccoli must not be overcooked: test it by piercing with a knife.)

Step Three : Once the soup is ready, blend using a hand-held stick blender or whizz in batches in a food processor –  add a little hot water if your soup is too thick.  Season to taste with salt and pepper and add the lemon juice.

Step Four : To serve, divide between bowls, then swirl in a topping of your choice such as crumbled cheese.

Food Focus : Bounteous broccoli

Article courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (March 2019) and written by Eve Kalinik. (evekalinik.com)

broccoliBroccoli may be dubbed the ultimate ‘green machine’.  Indeed, this cruciferous powerhouse has a whole lot of natural ammo.

Firstly, broccoli contains a compound called idole-3-carbinol (I3C), which is derived from a type of phytochemical present in all cruciferous vegetables that becomes active when we chop or chew them.  This compound helps to support detoxification pathways in the liver and may have beneficial effects on hormone balancing.  Chewing broccoli also releases sulforaphane, which gives it that distinct ‘sulphurous’ taste and smell, that supports healthy cell turnover, including arresting the development of what could turn into potentially unhealthy cells.  If that’s wasn’t amazing enough, broccoli is also a massive boost for our gut since it contains plenty of fibre, which is welcome news for our gut microbes as they love the stuff.  Additionally, some of the active chemical antioxidant compounds mentioned above also support a healthy microbiome.

Let’s also not forget that broccoli is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin K, important for bone and cardiovascular health; vitamin C to provide antioxidant ‘protective’ support for our cells and a wealth of B vitamins, which have a role in energy production as well as working as co-factors for hormonal health and neurotransmitter functioning for brain power … come to think of it, broccoli does have somewhat of a cerebellum look!

You can get broccoli in numerous varieties including purple (or yellow) sprouted, Tenderstem, in shoot-like sprout form (also the highest form of sulforaphane) or in just the regular green variety.

Purple sprouted works really well with a dressing of sesame oil and tamari; broccoli sprouts are excellent toppers for salads, whereas the regular florets pan-fried with some thin slices of garlic, lemon juice and a generous drizzle of cold-pressed olive oil are simply heavenly.  Generally, it is better eating your broccoli lightly cooked rather than eating lots of it raw, since cooking negates the possible effects it can have on thyroid functioning, particularly if you have any underactive thyroid issues.  It’s tastes better that way, too.

Grow:
You can grow your own sprouts at home.  Get yourself a germinator like below A Vogel BioSnacky Germinator Seed Jar.

Source:
Broccoli is a veg that we have in abundance in the UK and it’s great if you can get to your farmers’ market and check out the varieties in season.  For farmers’ markets, see http://www.farma.gov.uk

Cook:
Anna Jones has taken veg-centric food to another level with her book, “The Modern Cook’s Year”.  And her broccoli recipes do not disappoint!

Food Focus : Mushy for Peas

Courtesy of Psychologies Magazine (August 2019)

Peas

The bright garden hue and punchy sweet flavour of garden peas win favours with even the most veg-phobic people.  Indeed, peas will happily be consumed and even relished when other veggies fail to make the cut.  Fresh green peas invoke a sense of cheeriness in their appearance and within the pod there is much to rave about.

Garden peas are part of the legume family, which means they have some of the same benefits as green beans.  They provide a decent serving of plant-based protein, as well as fibre, which helps support energy, blood sugar levels and gut health.  Peas are also bursting with vitamins C and A – important for immunity and skin as well as providing protective antioxidant benefits.  They contain vitamin K and B vitamins that can support a healthy heart and, since they are a good source of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), a plant-based source of omega-3 essential fatty acids, they also have anti-inflammatory benefits.

Peas are considered environmentally friendly, given that they essentially give back to the soil in which they are grown, which helps with the rotation of other crops.  Impressive nutritional stats and generous, given their small, or petits, size.

Peas are encased in pods and need to be shelled before eating and, while best fresh, frozen peas can also be enjoyed in which case I urge you to have petits pois for more flavour and less starch.  When peas are in season, from late spring to the end of autumn, you can often find them at farmers’ markets.

The ways in which to enjoy peas are myriad and marvellous.  Simply prepared – lightly steamed and served with fresh mint, butter and black pepper – peas are a game-changing veggie side dish.  Add them to an omelette with feta for a delicious quick meal or chuck them into stir-fries for a pop of sweetness.  You can even turn them into fun and flavoursome desserts.  (Pea mousse, anyone?)  Like peas in a pod, the saying goes …. I, for one, want to be in that gang!

Cook:
If cooking, your peas from frozen, opt for petits pois and add at the last moment – frozen peas thaw quickly and you will want to maximise their delicious flavour in your dish.

Create:
Poisfection!   There is a recipe for Pea and Mint Ice Lollies with Chocolate from The Art of Eating Well by Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley. Everyone will be licking their lips!

Drink:
Try: Seedlip Garden 108 Non-alcoholic Spirit, which highlights hand-picked peas as one of the key ingredients. Serve with tonic for a refreshing and uplifting summer drink.

Article by Nutrition editor: Eve Kalinik evekalinik.com; @evekalinik

Grilled Courgettes with Basil, Mint and Lemon

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine and taken from Summer Every Day by Acland Geddes and Pedro Da Silva.

Grilled courgettes

Serves : 4

Ingredients:
4 courgettes, sliced lengthwise
Olive oil, for brushing
1 garlic clove, crushed
Grated zest and freshly squeezed juice of 1 unwaxed lemon
2-3 sprigs fresh mint leaves, chopped
Small bunch of fresh basil, chopped
A handful of roasted hazelnuts

Step One : Warm a ridged grill pan or barbecue until it’s smoking hot. Brush the courgette slices with olive oil and cook on both sides until nicely charred. Remove from the pan.

Step Two : Mix together the crushed garlic, lemon juice, mint, half the basil and a good glug of olive oil. Pour over the grilled courgettes. Scatter with the remaining basil, roasted hazelnuts and the lemon zest. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and serve.

Carrot and Ginger Soup

CarrotsServes: 6-12

Ingredients:
225g onions, finely chopped
100g butter; 900g carrots, finely chopped
4 pieces ginger in syrup
1 glass of dry cooking sherry
900ml chicken or vegetable stock
Salt and pepper
Single cream (optional)
Parsley to garnish

Step One : Cook onions in butter until golden brown. Add carrots, ginger and sherry. Cover and simmer for 35-40 mins ensuring they do not dry out.

Step Two : Add stock and liquidise. Then sieve carefully back into pan. Season to taste and slowly add single cream (optional) until it turns the colour you prefer.

Step Three : Garnish with parsley. Serve hot or cold.

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Creamy Broccoli Soup

Recipe courtesy of Psychologies Magazine and taken from Danielle Walker’s Eat What You Love: 125 Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free, and Paleo Recipes .

Eliminating Dairy and wheat doesn’t mean giving up luscious soups. Instead of a roux, or cream, white sweet potatoes add silky richness.

creamy brocolli soupServes: 4-6

Ingredients:
3 tblsp ghee or extra virgin olive oil
2 cups chopped leeks, white and tender green parts
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
450g broccoli, cut into florets, stems peeled and chopped
1 small Hannah sweet potato or other white-fleshed variety, peeled and cut into cubes
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 cups Chicken bone broth
Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Step One : Melt the ghee in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the leeks and onion and saute for 3-4 minutes, stirring, until they are fragrant and softened. Add the broccoli, sweet potato, celery and garlic and continue to cook for 5 minutes more.

Step Two : Pour in the Chicken Bone Broth, add 1 1/2 tsp of salt and 1/4 tsp of pepper, and bring to a boil. Simmer for 8-10 minutes, until the vegetables are fork-tender and the broccoli is bright green.

Step Three : Using an immersion blender, or working in batches in a blender, blend the soup until smooth (if using a blender, remove the cap in the blender top and place a kitchen towel over the top to allow steam to release).

Step Four : Return the soup to the pan and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot, with a sprinkling of pepper and a drizzle of olive oil.

Garlic and Herb Crepes with Roast Vegetables

Serves: 6

Prep time: 15 mins, plus 30 mins standing time; Cook time: 1 hour

Delicious garlic and herb crepes make wonderful pockets for succulent roasted vegetables and plenty of rich creamy sauce.

Ingredients:
2 red peppers, deseeded and roughly chopped
2 yellow peppers, deseeded and roughly chopped
6oz (175g) onion, roughly chopped
1 aubergine, roughly chopped
2 courgettes, roughly chopped
2 tblsp (30ml) olive oil
1 quantity of crepe mixture
2 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 tblsp (15ml) chopped mixed fresh herbs
1oz (25g) butter
1oz (25g) flour
1 pint (600ml) milk
3oz (75g) Gruyere cheese, grated
3oz (75g) cheddar cheese, grated
1 tsp (5ml) Dijon mustard
1 egg yolk
Salt and pepper

Step One : Preheat the oven to Mark 6 / 400oF / 200oC. Place all of the chopped vegetables in a roasting tin with the olive oil and cook for 45 mins until they are tender and browned, turning them occasionally.

Step Two : Make the basic crepe mixture, then add the garlic and herbs. Rest mixture for 30 mins.

Step Three : Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan, add flour and cook for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and gradually add the milk. Bring to the boil, stirring. Cook for 2-3 mins. Stir in most of both cheeses, the mustard and the egg yolk. Season well, cover and keep warm.

Step Four : Cook the crepes. Fold into quarters to form triangles. Fill with the roasted vegetables and place in a single layer in a greased, shallow ovenproof dish. Pour over the sauce, sprinkle the remaining cheese over the crepes and grill until golden brown. Serve immediately.

Other crepe recipes …